Tag Archives: Tom Hiddleston

Villainous lines series

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April 26, 2017 · 10:34 pm

Villainous lines series

loki-quim

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Great use of a pop culture reference

avengers-reindeergames

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Great use of a pop culture reference

avengers-rockofages

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Villainous lines series

Loki-heart

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Villainous lines series

Loki-ant

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Villainous lines series

Loki-glorious purpose

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Favorite quote of the moment

Loki-line

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Only Lovers Left Alive

Director: Jim Jarmusch, Main Cast: Tom HiddlestonTilda SwintonMia WasikowskaJohn HurtAnton Yelchin;

only-lovers-left-alive

Every film by Jim Jarmusch feels like discovering a hidden treasure. The indie auteur par excellence gives us a story about love, darkness and the beauty of simple things, an extremely unusual take on a current mainstream theme: vampires. I know what you are thinking: “Vampires, seriously! Haven’t we seen and endured enough!?!”; well this is Jarmusch, give him a chance, you won’t be disappointed. The viewer is introduced to the titular lovers with a few masterful scenes. Adam (Hiddlestone) is a reclusive, underground musician with a penchant for science and technology who settled in Detroit (do I see a subtle homage/reference to Terry Gilliam in Adam’s tech contraptions? Maybe, maybe not). Eve (Swinton) is a book-lover (I used to pack like her before the advent of e-readers) and an aesthete, who resides in Tangier. They are both centuries-old vampires but they have found a non-violent way to feed, with the help of compliant doctors, not so much for moral qualms but to avoid hassles and prevent disruptions of their quite life. The audience makes also the acquaintance of Ian (Adam’s agent/helper), friendly, solicitous and  human, and Kit Marlowe, vampire, writer and old friend of Eve. Adam and Eve (always appreciate Jarmusch’s irony) have been together for a very long time and when Eve realises that Adam is depressed (again) about the state of the world, she rushes at his side.  We see them spending time together, in contented simplicity, talking about their past and present and sharing their interests. It is a rather alluring description of long-lasting love and friendship, that will go on with its perfect harmony, as in “my vegetable love should grow, vaster than empires, and more slow” (Andrew Marvell). Their domestic bliss is however shattered by the arrival of impulsive and reckless Ava, Eve’s sister. A poor judgement call on Ava’s part forces Adam and Eve to flee Detroit and go back to Tangier, where more woes await them. It is a haunting film, it feels like that place between sleep and awake. The captivating shots of a deserted Detroit and teeming Tangier tell a whole story by themselves, juxtapose as metaphors for Adam and Eve’s state of mind. The magnetic performances of Hiddlestone and Swinton (eerier than ever) and a mesmerising soundtrack complete the movie and make it a little gem. Beguiling —8/10

 

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Thor: The Dark World

Director: Alan Taylor, Main Cast: Chris HemsworthNatalie PortmanTom HiddlestonAnthony HopkinsIdris ElbaKat DenningsStellan SkarsgårdJaimie Alexander

This is one of the rare cases in which the sequel is better than the original movie (which has been made only, I suspect, to be sure that the non-geek crowd would recognise the blonde guy in the Avengers). The quality of the film is mostly due to the fact that there is more humor and that Loki is a scene stealer. Tom Hiddleston is brilliant as Loki, showing many layers within what was meant to be a clean-cut villain. This time Thor must fight to save not only Earth but his beloved Jane, his home world and the universe itself from the evil elves and never-ending darkness. To do so he must defy his father and ally with his untrustworthy brother, who uses his tricks to help him but also to pursuit his own machiavellian plan. Can Loki truly redeem himself or will he finally show his true colours? It’s easier to relate to him because he is conflicted, flawed and very human… for a god. Chris Hemsworth does a better job this time around as Thor, a more well-rounded performance and less super-buff caricature. Natalie Portman comes back as Jane Foster and she is unwittingly responsible of discovering the ultimate evil… why scientists are always held responsible for bringing doom to the planet? Hollywood seems to love that! And for the record: an astrophysicist is perfectly able to change her phone’s ringtone. Poor Stellan Skarsgard is relegate to comic relief alongside Kat Dennings. Anyway the film is very entertaining, with plenty of action and effective special effects. The 3D doesn’t add anything, as it is the case most of the time, but, at least, it’s not distracting or disturbing. Well done, let’s see what will come next! —6.5/10

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